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    Posts Tagged ‘C/2012 X1’

    Comet C/2012 X1 (Linear) outburst: a new image (1 Nov. 2013) and animation

     

    Comet C/2012 X1 Linear: 1 Nov. 2013

    Comet C/2012 X1 Linear: 1 Nov. 2013

    On 1 Nov. 2013, the Virtual Telescope visited comet C/2012 X1 Linear again, to cooperate in understanding its outburst event, as part of a collaboration among the Virtual Telescope Project, Remanzacco Observatory and Faulkes Telescopes Project. This joint campaign already produced very interesting results measuring and showing the expansion rate of the dust shell released after the outburst.

    Despite the foggy weather, new images were captured, remotely using the PlaneWave 17″ robotic unit part of the Virtual Telescope. Also, the morning twilight already started and made things less easy to handle.

    Above is an image coming from the average of six, 120-seconds unfiltered exposures, showing the comet fairly well. The size of the dusty cloud is clearly bigger than in our previous observations.  While the sky was not ideal, we obtained a usable image. Below is an animation putting together all (three) our available nights:


    These new images will be shared as part of the collaboration with Ernesto Guido, Nick Howes and Martino Nicolini (Remanzacco Observatory and Faulkes Telescopes Project).

    Check this page for an interesting analysis of the outburst!

     

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    Comet C/2012 X1 (Linear) outburst: a new image (28 Oct. 2013) and animation

     

    Comet C/2012 X1 Linear: 28 Oct. 2013

    Comet C/2012 X1 Linear: 28 Oct. 2013

    After the first attempt a few days ago, the Virtual Telescope visited comet C/2012 X1 Linear again, to cooperate in understanding its outburst event, as part of a collaboration among the Virtual Telescope Project, Remanzacco Observatory and Faulkes Telescopes Project. This joint campaign already produced very interesting results regarding the expansion rate of the dust shell released after the outburst.

    On 28 Oct. 2013 new images were collected, remotely using the PlaneWave 17″ robotic unit part of the Virtual Telescope. Weather conditions were foggy, improving only when the sky was starting to brighten, because of twilight.

    Above is an image coming from the average of five, 60-seconds unfiltered exposures, showing the comet fairly well. The size of the dusty cloud is clearly bigger than three nights before and it is shown in the animation below:

    These new images will be shared as part of the collaboration with Ernesto Guido, Nick Howes and Martino Nicolini (Remanzacco Observatory and Faulkes Telescopes Project).

    Check this page for an interesting analysis of the outburst!

     

    Back to “Solar System” page

     

     

    Comet C/2012 X1 (Linear) outburst: image analysis

    Comet C/2012 X1 Linear: 25 Oct. 2013

    Comet C/2012 X1 Linear: 25 Oct. 2013

    As reported a few days ago, comet C/2012 X1 Linear is undergoing a bright outburst (but not enough to make it visible by naked eye). The Virtual Telescope managed to capture a few images at dawn, recording this unusual event.

    As a consequence of the outburst, the comet released a dust cloud, now expanding around the nucleus. Something similar, but to a larger scale,  happened in 2007 with comet 17P/Holmes.

    Studying the evolution of this phenomenon is of great interest, especially using data covering a suitable time span. For this, we started a collaboration with Ernesto Guido, Nick Howes and Martino Nicolini (Remanzacco Observatory and Faulkes Telescopes Project), joining our data covering the outburst on two different days (21 Oct. – Remanzacco data – and 25 Oct. – Virtual Telescope data).

    Careful image processing and analysis was performed by M. Nicolini, using specific algorithms and providing very interesting results, shown in the video below.

     

     

    In the covered time interval, the dust shell expanded from 113 arcseconds to 202 arcseconds in about 88 hours (3.66 days) corresponding, at the distance of 2.95 Astronomical Units of the comet, to a projected speed of 0.6 km/s. Quite interestingly, this value is similar to the one shown by comet 17P/Holmes in 2007, which resulted constantly around  0.554 +/- 0.005 km/s from October 25.8 to November 1.6 (Yi Lin et al., The Astronomical Journal 138, 625).

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    Comet C/2012 X1 (LINEAR): image of the outburst (25 Oct. 2013)

     

    Comet C/2012 X1 Linear: 25 Oct. 2013

    Comet C/2012 X1 Linear: 25 Oct. 2013

    It is well known that comets are unpredictable by nature. While to world is closely monitoring comet C/2012 S1 Ison, comet C/2012 X1 Linear decided to put its own show, in a season exceptionally offering an handful of fairly bright comets (comets 2P/Encke, C/2013 R1 Lovejoy and C/2012 S1 Ison).

    A few days ago, comet C/2012 X1 was spotted while emerging at dawn from the solar glare and was found about 6 magnitudes brighter than expected! This is what we call an “outburst” and comets show from time to time similar behavior (as the exceptional case of comet 17P/Holmes in 2007).

    Above is an image captured at twilight with the PlaneWave 17″ robotic unit part of the Virtual Telescope. It is the average of four, 60-seconds exposures and shows very well the expanding dust cloud around the false nucleus. Some structures are also visible without any processing (the image above was just calibrated, without any other enhancement).

    Below, the same image was processed with a rotational gradient, extracting the pattern around the central condensation, already visible in the original data:

     

    Comet C/2012 X1 Linear: 25 Oct. 2013
    Comet C/2012 X1 Linear: 25 Oct. 2013

     

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