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Scientists Rock – an Asteroid Day series | Episode 2

Scientists Rock - an Asteroid Day series

Scientists Rock – an Asteroid Day series

Here it is the second episode of the special series “Scientists Rock”, made for Asteroid Day 2016. At Virtual Telescope we provided the subtitles in Italian.

Ecco il secondo episodio della serie speciale “Scientists Rock”, appositamente realizzata per Asteroid Day 2016. Il Virtual Telescope ha curato la realizzazione dei sottotitoli in Italiano.

Back to “Asteroid Day 2016”

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If everyone reading this right now would donate something, our fundraiser would be done in a few days. Please, donate and receive an exclusive, LIMITED EDITION image of potentially hazardous asteroids taken by the Virtual Telescope! specifically made for supporters like you!

donate now (you can adjust the amount later)

 

Scientists Rock – an Asteroid Day series | Episode 1

Scientists Rock - an Asteroid Day series | Episode 1

Scientists Rock – an Asteroid Day series | Episode 1

Here it is the first episode of the special series “Scientists Rock”, made for Asteroid Day 2016. At Virtual Telescope we provided the subtitles in Italian.

Ecco il primo episodio della serie speciale “Scientists Rock”, appositamente realizzata per Asteroid Day 2016. Il Virtual Telescope ha curato la realizzazione dei sottotitoli in Italiano.

Back to “Asteroid Day 2016”

 

Support The Virtual Telescope Project!

If everyone reading this right now would donate something, our fundraiser would be done in a few days. Please, donate and receive an exclusive, LIMITED EDITION image of potentially hazardous asteroids taken by the Virtual Telescope! specifically made for supporters like you!

donate now (you can adjust the amount later)

 

2016 Summer Solstice Full Moon: 20 June 2016

Summer Solstice Full Moon: 20 June 2016

Summer Solstice Full Moon: 20 June 2016

As we reported earlier today, This summer solstice is introduced by a Full Moon.  Last time it happened was in 1967. The image below shows the Moon while rising, as seen from Rome, Italy.

It is a single shot, taken with a Canon 7D mark II DSLR, equipped with a Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8 L IS II USM, used at 200mm. Some trees are marginally visible.

The image below was exposed on the Moon directly, to show its features at its best; the same setup as above was used.

Summer Solstice Full Moon: lunar craters and seas

Summer Solstice Full Moon: lunar craters and seas

This photo © by Gianluca Masi. Cannot be used without permission

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Support The Virtual Telescope Project!

If everyone reading this right now would donate something, our fundraiser would be done in a few days. Please, donate and receive an exclusive, LIMITED EDITION image of potentially hazardous asteroids taken by the Virtual Telescope! specifically made for supporters like you!

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“Occhi su Saturno”: evento online (25 giugno 2016)

Occhi su Saturno 2016: Locandina

Occhi su Saturno 2016: Locandina

Segui la diretta qui!

Torna “Occhi su Saturno“, ormai giunto alla 5a edizione. Anche quest’anno il Virtual Telescope trasmetterà in diretta le immagini del meraviglioso Signore degli Anelli del Sistema Solare.

L’appuntamento è per il 25 giugno 2016, a partire dalle ore 23:00, sul canale live del Virtual Telescope, disponibile qui.

Eyes on Saturn” (“Occhi su Saturno”) is back, now at its 5th edition. Even this year, the Virtual Telescope will share live images of the elegant Lord of the Rings of our Solar System.

The event is scheduled for 25 June 2016, starting at 21:00 UT, on the Virtual Telescope’s live channel here!

Torna alla pagine “Prossimi Eventi”

Please wait while you are redirected...or Click Here if you do not want to wait.

Support The Virtual Telescope Project!

If everyone reading this right now would donate something, our fundraiser would be done in a few days. Please, donate and receive an exclusive, LIMITED EDITION image of potentially hazardous asteroids taken by the Virtual Telescope! specifically made for supporters like you!

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20 June 2016: summer solstice in the Northern Hemisphere

20 June 2016: summer solstice

20 June 2016: summer solstice

Next 20 June 2016, at 22:34 Universal Time, the Sun will reach its maximum declination (angular distance from the celestial equator): this will officially be the summer solstice in the northern hemisphere.  In that moment, the Sun will be at its more distance position from the celestial equator (23° 27′), in the northern part of the sky: this will give the longer “day” in that portion of the globe, as the Sun will stay for the  maximum number of hours above the horizon. Conversely, for southern  people, this will be the winter solstice.

At mid-, northern latitudes, the  astronomical night last for an handful of hours and deep sky lovers have just a little time to observe/image vary pale objects. For example, in Rome that day darkness (that is, the time the Sun will stay below the horizon) will last a bit less than 9 hours, while six months ago, it lasted more than 14.5 hours. A long, clear winter night is a big gift!

Half a day earlier, the Moon will be full (11:02 UT): it will be, for those seeing the polar star, the most southern full Moon of the year (though not the most southern possible one). This will help taking great images including both the Moon and some nice terrestrial/artistic elements.

The term “solstice” originates from the apparent behavior of the Sun: in that moment, the solar declination seem to stands still, being at its peak: from that moment, the Sun will start going down, slowly at first, but continuously increasing its rate to the celestial equator.

Back to “Star Words” page

Support The Virtual Telescope Project!

If everyone reading this right now would donate something, our fundraiser would be done in a few days. Please, donate and receive an exclusive, LIMITED EDITION image of potentially hazardous asteroids taken by the Virtual Telescope! specifically made for supporters like you!

donate now (you can adjust the amount later)

 

Near-Earth Asteroid 2016 LK49 close encounter: an image (15 June 2016)

Near-Earth Asteroid 2016 LK49 close encounter: 15 June 2016

Near-Earth Asteroid 2016 LK49 close encounter: 15 June 2016

Later today, on 16 June 2016 at 13:54 UT, the 30 meters large near-Earth asteroid 2016 LK49  will make a close, but safe, encounter with the Earth, coming at 1.2 millions of km from us, that is 3.2 lunar distances.

At Virtual Telescope we tried to grab it,as part of our imaging project, involving all the asteroids coming significantly close to the Earth.

The image above is a single 180-seconds exposure, remotely taken with PlaneWave 17″+Paramount ME+SBIG STL-6303E robotic unit part of the Virtual Telescope. The robotic mount tracked the fast (97″/minute) apparent motion of the asteroid, so stars are trailing, while the asteroid is perfectly tracked (the minor planet is the little sharp dot in the center, marked with two white lines). At the imaging time, the object was at about mag. 18.9 and at about 1.8 millions of km from our planet. These superb images show the excellence of the Virtual Telescope with these very demaning targets.

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If everyone reading this right now would donate something, our fundraiser would be done in a few days. Please, donate and receive an exclusive, LIMITED EDITION image of potentially hazardous asteroids taken by the Virtual Telescope! specifically made for supporters like you!

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The realm of the dwarf planets: a view from the Virtual Telescope

The five dwarf planets of our Solar System

The five dwarf planets of our Solar System

Our Solar System is a much more fascinating and complex place than many of us believe. Only ten years ago, astronomers decided that Pluto was indeed not a planet, but a dwarf one, creating a new class of objects in our Solar System. This decision was not an easy one and many people out there are asking to have the planetary crown back on the Pluto head. In a nutshell, all this is saying us that there are many things we still need to discover and understand, even in such a “small” place as our Solar family.

Recently, the Virtual Telescope completed its coverage of all the fine dwarf planets now part of that family. The image below show all of them: each object is marked with two white lines. Details are available for each object: Ceres, Pluto, Eris, Haumea and Makemake.

All the images were remotely taken with the PlaneWave 17″ + Paramount ME + SBIG STL-6303E robotic unit part of the Virtual Telescope.

Support The Virtual Telescope Project!

If everyone reading this right now would donate something, our fundraiser would be done in a few days. Please, donate and receive an exclusive, LIMITED EDITION image of potentially hazardous asteroids taken by the Virtual Telescope! specifically made for supporters like you!

donate now (you can adjust the amount later)

 

Near-Earth Asteroids: some images and videos from the Virtual Telescope Project for Asteroid Day.

Asteroid day 2016 at Virtual Telescope Project

Asteroid day 2016 at Virtual Telescope Project

The amazing Asteroid Day is approaching and, as you know, the Virtual Telescope will offer several great online events, with amazing guests and more.

But not only we want to offer our own activities to you: we also want to support you organizing your own Asteroid Day event! We do this by offering you some of our stunning images and videos showing some of these near-Earth objects! Virtual Telescope is one of the best facilities tracking these exotic rocks: our technology is just perfect for tracking any asteroid, no matter how fast it is moving in the sky. You will not find better stuff this this one from us.

Below you will find some of these images, with links to the best resolution version. These images are free to use, for not commercial purposes only, but you must put this credit visible: “This image is a courtesy of the Virtual Telescope Project – www.virtualtelescope.eu – for Asteroid Day“. Of course, we  would appreciate to know you are using them, so please drop us a line!

The images/video below are just a small sample of our huge asteroid collection: check it out here the whole collection.

Images

Videos

Comet C/2016 BA14 meets Messier 106: 24 Mar. 2016

Comet C/2016 BA14 meets Messier 106: 20 Mar. 2016

Potentially Hazardous Asteroid 2015 TB145: 30/31 Oct. 2015

Near-Earth Asteroid 2014 SC324: a movie (25 Oct. 2014)

Near-Earth Asteroid 2014 SC324: a movie (25 Oct. 2014)

Asteroid 2012 DA: 15 Feb. 2013

Near-Earth Asteroid 2014 DX110: a movie (5 Mar. 2014)

Potentially Hazardous Asteroid (1566) Icarus: 15 June 2015

Potentially Hazardous Asteroid (1566) Icarus: 15 June 2015

 

Support The Virtual Telescope Project!

If everyone reading this right now would donate something, our fundraiser would be done in a few days. Please, donate and receive an exclusive, LIMITED EDITION image of potentially hazardous asteroids taken by the Virtual Telescope! specifically made for supporters like you!

donate now (you can adjust the amount later)

 

Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko: a new image (06 June 2016)

Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko: 06 June 2016

Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko: 06 June 2016

After almost two months from our previous observations, at Virtual Telescope we wanted to observe comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko again, while it is getting fainter and fainter. Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is the target of theESA Rosetta space mission.

This image above comes from the average of six, 300-seconds exposures, unfiltered, remotely collected with the  PlaneWave 17″+Paramount ME+SBIG STL-6303E robotic unit part of the Virtual Telescope Project. Binning 2×2, with a resulting scale of 1.2″/pixel. The robotic telescope tracked the apparent motion of the comet, so stars left trails on the background. A faint tail is visible, extending at least for 6 arcminutes. On the right, a negative palette, helps displaying that feature.

Back to “Solar System” page

Support The Virtual Telescope Project!

If everyone reading this right now would donate something, our fundraiser would be done in a few days. Please, donate and receive an exclusive, LIMITED EDITION image of potentially hazardous asteroids taken by the Virtual Telescope! specifically made for supporters like you!

donate now (you can adjust the amount later)

 

Near-Earth Asteroid 2016 LT1 very close encounter: an image (06 June 2016)

Near-Earth Asteroid 2016 LT1 very close encounter: 06 June 2016

Near-Earth Asteroid 2016 LT1 very close encounter: 06 June 2016

On June 7, at 20:25 UT the 6-meters large asteroid 2016 LT1 will have an extremely close encounter with the Earth, reaching a minimum distance from us of 153.000 km, 0.4 times the mean distance of the Moon. This is a largely safe encounter. 2016 LT1 was discovered on 4 June by the Panstarrs survey in Hawaii.

While it was approaching us, at Virtual Telescope we managed to capture it, thanks to our advanced technology, making our system just wonderful for this.

The image above is a single 180-seconds exposure, remotely taken with PlaneWave 17″+Paramount ME+SBIG STL-6303E robotic unit part of the Virtual Telescope. The robotic mount tracked the  fast (30″/minute) apparent motion of the asteroid, so stars are trailing, while the asteroid is perfectly tracked (the minor planet is the  sharp dot in the center). At the imaging time, the object was at about mag. 18.0 and at about 1.6 millions km from our planet and approaching.

This approach is coming on the eve of the Asteroid Day international event, when the Virtual Telescope will offer a lot of online activities.

Back to “Solar System” page

 

Support The Virtual Telescope Project!

If everyone reading this right now would donate something, our fundraiser would be done in a few days. Please, donate and receive an exclusive, LIMITED EDITION image of potentially hazardous asteroids taken by the Virtual Telescope! specifically made for supporters like you!

donate now (you can adjust the amount later)

 

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