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Archive for the ‘free’ Category

Ceres and Vesta close conjunction: image and podcast (5 July 2014)

Ceres and Vesta close conjunction: 5 July 2014

Ceres and Vesta close conjunction: 5 July 2014

Finally, at Virtual Telescope we observed the dwarf planet (1) Ceres and the asteroid (4) Vesta at their minimum angular distance (10 arcminutes, 1/3 of the angular size of the full Moon disk), sharing the sight with several thousands of people from all around the globe, who joined our live coverage of the conjunction.

Above is a spectacular image, coming from the average of three, 15-seconds exposures, then superimposed after registering them against the stars. As both Ceres and Vesta were moving across the stars, they changed position from one image to the other, this explaining why they show as “triple” objects (three images!). All the images were collected remotely with the 17″ robotic unit part of the Virtual Telescope. There was a very strong interference by the Moon, less than 10 deg apart.

Below is a podcast coming from the live coverage.

Back to “podcast” page

Ceres and Vesta close conjunction: a new image (4 July 2014)

The dwarf planet (1) Ceres and the asteroid (4) Vesta

The dwarf planet (1) Ceres and the asteroid (4) Vesta

While Ceres and Vesta prepare their closest conjunction. at Virtual Telescope we imaged this unusual couple again.

Above is an image showing the dwarf planet Ceres and the asteroid Vesta less than 12 arcminutes apart, with Vesta being clearly brighter than the other.

The image above was remotely taken with the 17″ robotic unit part of the Virtual Telescope.

*** See Ceres and Vesta conjunction live here! ***

Back to “Star Words”

Ceres and Vesta close conjunction: an image (3 July 2014)

The dwarf planet (1) Ceres and the asteroid (4) Vesta

The dwarf planet (1) Ceres and the asteroid (4) Vesta

Next 5 July, we will show live the amazing, rare conjunction between the dwarf planet Ceres and the asteroid Vesta. While waiting for this big show, we captured this view already showing the couple so close in perspective.

The image is a single 60-seconds exposure, remotely taken with the 14″ robotic unit part of the Virtual Telescope. The field of view is 10′x15′, so it is clear that the two bodies are in a patch of sky smaller than the angular size of the Moon.

A satellite trail is also visible, enriching the view.

Back to “Star Words” page

Ceres and Vesta meet in the sky: online observing session (5 July 2014)

Ceres and Vesta meet in the sky

Ceres and Vesta meet in the sky

*** See Ceres and Vesta live here! ***

Next 5 July 2014, the dwarf planet Ceres and the asteroid Vesta will apparently meet in the same spot in the sky: they will be less than 10 arc-minutes apart, being an easy target for small scopes. Their last conjunction was in 1996, but at that time they were more than two degrees apart.

At Virtual Telescope we planned to show live this rare event, for free, thanks to our robotic telescopes and our live webTV.

The online, free session is scheduled for 5 July 2014, starting at 20:00 UT.

To join, you just need to enter, at the date and time above, our webTV page here!

Please wait while you are redirected...or Click Here if you do not want to wait.

Back to “Upcoming Events”

 

Potentially Hazardous Asteroid 2014 HQ124: podcast and image (10 June 2014)

Potentially Hazardous Asteroid 2014 HQ124: 10 June 2014

Potentially Hazardous Asteroid 2014 HQ124: 10 June 2014

On 10 June 2014 at Virtual Telescope we shared live, online, the potentially hazardous asteroid 2014 HQ124, a couple of days after its close encounter with the Earth. The session was a big success, with the asteroid beautifully visible and perfectly tracked by our systems.

Above is an image coming the live show, captured with the 17″ robotic unit, where the asteroid is visible in the center: the telescope was tracking 2014 HQ124, so stars are apparently sliding.

Below is the full podcast from the online event

 

Back to “podcast” page

 

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