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    Archive for the ‘free’ Category

    “Stars for All!”: online cosmic journey – 27 April 2016

    “Stars for All!” – online event

    “Stars for All!” – online event

    an official event for Global Astronomy Month (April 2016)

    *** Join it LIVE here! ***

    Join this fabulous live, online observing event from the Virtual Telescope in Italy, hosted by Dr. Gianluca Masi!

    If you have been waiting for your turn to leave for an unforgettable cruise across space and time, Global Astronomy Month (GAM2016) is bringing to you the right chance! Fasten your seat belt and fly to the stars, just connecting with your computer to this web page! Meet other friends online and share your thoughts with them.

    The Universe will look as never seen before, are you ready?

    Join us on April 27, starting at 19.30 Universal Time! You just need to access our online webTV, click here!

    Don’t miss Global Astronomy Month, and be ready to celebrate the Universe with us!

    Back to “Upcoming Events”

    Please wait while you are redirected...or Click Here if you do not want to wait.

    Support The Virtual Telescope Project!

    If everyone reading this right now would donate something, our fundraiser would be done in a few days. Please, donate and receive an exclusive, LIMITED EDITION image of potentially hazardous asteroids taken by the Virtual Telescope! specifically made for supporters like you!

    donate now (you can adjust the amount later)

     

    The 9 May 2016 transit of Mercury : online observing session

    The 9 May 2016 transit of Mercury : online observing session - poster of the event

    The 9 May 2016 transit of Mercury : online observing session – poster of the event

    Next 9 May 2016, the sky will offer us a truly spectacular and rare astronomical event: a transit of planet Mercury in front of the Sun. This is the first of these transits after the 2006 one. The last Mercury transit visible from Europe was in 2003.

    The Virtual Telescope Project will bring this stunning cosmic event to you in real time, online, thanks to the most modern technologies, with the live comment by the astrophysicist Gianluca Masi, the inventor and manager of the Virtual Telescope Project. Thanks to us, not only you can see this marvelous show no matter where you are on the globe, but you will do this with full safety: never forget that observing the Sun, even by naked eye, is extremely dangers, as you can permanently damage your sight.

    The live, free  coverage is scheduled for 9 May 2016, starting at 11:00 UT.

    To join, you just need to enter, at the date and time above, our webTV page here!

    Back to “Upcoming Events”

    Please wait while you are redirected...or Click Here if you do not want to wait.

    Support The Virtual Telescope Project!

    If everyone reading this right now would donate something, our fundraiser would be done in a few days. Please, donate and receive an exclusive, LIMITED EDITION image of potentially hazardous asteroids taken by the Virtual Telescope! specifically made for supporters like you!

    donate now (you can adjust the amount later)

     

    Record making comet P2016 BA14 Panstarrs: new images with tail and a stunning video with Messier 106 (24 Mar. 2016)

    Comet P2016 BA14 Panstarrs shows a nice tail - 24 Mar. 2016

    Comet P2016 BA14 Panstarrs shows a nice tail – 24 Mar. 2016

    While it is leaving us after making history with its flyby, at Virtual Telescope we are continuously tracking comet P/2016 BA14 Panstarrs. Unfortunately, there is still a Full Moon and we had to fight against lots of clouds, but we could grab some interesting images, showing a nice tail.

    The image above is the average of 14, 120-seconds unfiltered exposure, remotely collected with the  PlaneWave 17″+Paramount ME+SBIG STL-6303E robotic unit part of the Virtual Telescope Project. The telescope tracked the apparent motion of the object during the exposures. The comet is clearly showing a tail. At the imaging time, there was a severe Full Moon, with clouds all around.

    The comet was also moving in a very interesting spot of heaven, “meeting” several interesting galaxies. The video below is quite stunning: P/2016 BA14 joins the marvelous spiral galaxy Messier 106, in Canes Venatici. Truly an amazing sight! In this video, North is right, East on the bottom; there are a few hot pixels, too.

    The motion seen there is 240X the real one.

    A still image is below, where  a few frames were averaged: the comet is now looking as a dotted trail.

    Comet P/2016 BA14 and Messier 106 - 24 Mar. 2016

    Comet P/2016 BA14 and Messier 106 – 24 Mar. 2016

    Back to “Solar System” page

     

    Support The Virtual Telescope Project!

    If everyone reading this right now would donate something, our fundraiser would be done in a few days. Please, donate and receive an exclusive, LIMITED EDITION image of potentially hazardous asteroids taken by the Virtual Telescope! specifically made for supporters like you!

    donate now (you can adjust the amount later)

     

    Comet P/2016 BA14 Panstarrs historic close encounter: an image and podcast (22 Mar. 2016)

    Comet P/2016 BA14 Panstarrs: a faint tail is visible - 22 Mar. 2016

    Comet P/2016 BA14 Panstarrs: a faint tail is visible – 22 Mar. 2016

    After several nights of coverage, waiting for its flyby, finally comet P/2016 BA14 Panstarrs touched its minimum distance from us: 3.5 millions of km, making it the third comet ever in history coming so close.

    At Virtual Telescope we planned two online, observing sessions, to share such a very rare event with the world. Both of them turned out to be truly spectacular ones.  A total of more than 50.000 individuals joined our webcasts and we were lucky to have clear skies on both nights.

    We also succeeded detecting a coma around this object. It was not easy, as the Moon was full and there were always clouds around. The image above comes from the average (left) and median combining (right) of 29, 60-seconds unfiltered exposure, remotely collected with the  PlaneWave 17″+Paramount ME+SBIG STL-6303E robotic unit part of the Virtual Telescope Project. The telescope tracked the apparent motion of the object (48″/min) during the exposures. At the imaging time, a 99.6%, extremely bright full Moon was high in the sky, 38 deg. away from the target. Comet P/2016 BA14 was at 3.6 millions of km from us. A faint, elongated coma and small tail are visible, underlining how this object is really a comet. Likely, it is a fragment of comet 252P/Linear.

    Below are the podcasts from both our live webcasts.

    21 March 2016

    22 March 2016

    Back to “Solar System” page

    Support The Virtual Telescope Project!

    If everyone reading this right now would donate something, our fundraiser would be done in a few days. Please, donate and receive an exclusive, LIMITED EDITION image of potentially hazardous asteroids taken by the Virtual Telescope! specifically made for supporters like you!

    donate now (you can adjust the amount later)

     

    “Comet P/2016 BA14 Panstarrs: a historic close encounter” – online event (21 & 22 March 2016)

    "Comet P/2016 BA14 Panstarrs: a historic close encounter": 21&22 Mar. 2016

    “Comet P/2016 BA14 Panstarrs: a historic close encounter”: 21&22 Mar. 2016

    Next 22 March 2016, comet P/2016 BA14 Panstarss will make a truly historic close encounter with our planet, reaching a minimum distance from us of about 3,6 millions of km. While this distance is absolutely safe, it will make P/2016 BA14 the third closest comet ever in history.

    At Virtual Telescope we will show this comet live, online, so that everyone can have a look at this record event from the comfort of home.

    Two online, free sessions are scheduled for 21 and 22 Mar. 2016, starting at 21:00 UT.

    To join, you just need to enter, at the date and time above, our webTV page here!

    Back to “Upcoming Events”

    Please wait while you are redirected...or Click Here if you do not want to wait.

    Support The Virtual Telescope Project!

    If everyone reading this right now would donate something, our fundraiser would be done in a few days. Please, donate and receive an exclusive, LIMITED EDITION image of potentially hazardous asteroids taken by the Virtual Telescope! specifically made for supporters like you!

    donate now (you can adjust the amount later)

     

    Online Messier Marathon – 8th edition! – 28 April 2016

    Online Messier Marathon – 8th Edition!

    Online Messier Marathon – 8th Edition!

    an official event for Global Astronomy Month (April 2016)

    *** Join it here! ***

    Would you like to explore the many treasures of the famous Messier Catalogue from home? Would you like to see as many of them as possible, in a single night? This is what is called a Messier Marathon! It is a legendary event for star lovers and bow you can join it live, online!

    After the unprecedented success of previous editions, even for Global Astronomy Month 2016 (GAM 2016, April 2016), we will offer an Online Messier Marathon, using our robotic telescopes, providing real time images and live comments. All this while chatting and sharing your passion and excitement with friends from all around the world.

    Join us on April 28, starting at 21.00 Universal Time! You just need to access our online webTV, click here!

    Don’t miss Global Astronomy Month, and be ready to celebrate the Universe with us!

    Back to “Upcoming Events”

    Please wait while you are redirected...or Click Here if you do not want to wait.

    Support The Virtual Telescope Project!

    If everyone reading this right now would donate something, our fundraiser would be done in a few days. Please, donate and receive an exclusive, LIMITED EDITION image of potentially hazardous asteroids taken by the Virtual Telescope! specifically made for supporters like you!

    donate now (you can adjust the amount later)

     

    ASASSN-15lh, la più luminosa supernova della storia – evento live (28 marzo 2016, ore 21:30)

    ASASSN-15lh, la più luminosa supernova della storia - 28 marzo 2016, ore 21:30

    ASASSN-15lh, la più luminosa supernova della storia – 28 marzo 2016, ore 21:30

    In questi giorni la rivista Science ha diffuso lo studio che riguarda la straordinaria supernova ASASSN-15lh, risultata di gran lunga la più luminosa mai scoperta nella storia. Gianluca Masi, astrofisisico, fondatore e responsabile scientifico del Virtual Telescope, figura quale co-autore sia della circolare di scoperta dell’astro che dello studio pubblicato su Science. Un risultato realmente storico, con affascinanti ricadute scientifiche.

    Proprio Gianluca Masi parlerà di questa straordinaria scoperta che lo vede protagonista il prossimo 28 marzo, alle ore 21:30, in uno speficico appuntamento online prodotto dal Virtual Telescope.

    Per partecipare sarà sufficiente accedere, il 28 marzo alle 21:30, alla consueta webTV del Virtual Telescope.

    [nell’immagine in alto: rappresentazione artistica della supernova da record ASASSN-15lh, così come apparirebbe da un esopianeta distante da essa circa 10.000 anni luce. (Credits: Beijing Planetarium / Jin Ma)]

    Back to “upcoming events”

    Support The Virtual Telescope Project!

    If everyone reading this right now would donate something, our fundraiser would be done in a few days. Please, donate and receive an exclusive, LIMITED EDITION image of potentially hazardous asteroids taken by the Virtual Telescope! specifically made for supporters like you!

    donate now (you can adjust the amount later)

     

    The Moon meets Aldebaran: online observation of the lunar occultation – 23 Dec. 2015 – animations and podcast

    The Moon is occulting Aldebaran: 23 Dec. 2015

    The Moon is occulting Aldebaran: 23 Dec. 2015

    Last 23 Dec., we successfully shared live, online, the lunar occultation of the bright star Aldebaran. It was the last event of a very intense 2015 and we are pleased to provide here the podcast, as well as a couple of nice animations.

    The image above shows Aldebaran just seconds before disappearing behind the Moon. The star was covered by the dark border of the Moon and that made the ingress truly scenic for all those connected live to the Virtual Telescope’s webcast.

    Using all the frames grabbed around the ingress time, which happened around 18:05:04 UT, we did this very nice animation, beautifully showing the lunar motion:

    The Moon occults Aldebaran: ingress - 23 Dec. 2015

    The Moon occults Aldebaran: ingress – 23 Dec. 2015

     

    One hour later, at 19:08:09 UT, we recorded the end of the occultation, documented in the sequence below, this time covering the bright border of the Moon:

    The Moon occults Aldebaran: egress - 23 Dec. 2015

    The Moon occults Aldebaran: egress – 23 Dec. 2015

    Finally, below is the full podcast fropm our live feed:

    Back to “podcasts” page

    Support The Virtual Telescope Project!

    If everyone reading this right now would donate something, our fundraiser would be done in a few days. Please, donate and receive an exclusive, LIMITED EDITION image of potentially hazardous asteroids taken by the Virtual Telescope! specifically made for supporters like you!

    donate now (you can adjust the amount later)

     

    The Moon meets Aldebaran: online observation of the lunar occultation – 23 Dec. 2015

    23 Dec. 2015, the Moon meets Aldebaran: online session

    23 Dec. 2015, the Moon meets Aldebaran: online session

    Next 23 Dec. 2015, the Moon will occult the bright star Aldebaran, the most luminous one in Taurus. It will be a spectacular sight and here at Virtual Telescope we will bring the experience to you, live, online!

    Join our free, live webcast from the comfort of your home, you just need a computer/tablet/smartphone and a internet connection.

    To see the Moon occulting Aldebaran live, just come back here on 23 Dec. 2015, starting at 17:45 UT

    The online, free session is scheduled for 23 Dec. 2015, starting at 17:45 UT.

    To join, you just need to enter, at the date and time above, our webTV page here!

    Back to “Upcoming Events”

    Please wait while you are redirected...or Click Here if you do not want to wait.

    Support The Virtual Telescope Project!

    If everyone reading this right now would donate something, our fundraiser would be done in a few days. Please, donate and receive an exclusive, LIMITED EDITION image of potentially hazardous asteroids taken by the Virtual Telescope! specifically made for supporters like you!

    donate now (you can adjust the amount later)

     

    Potentially Hazardous Asteroid 2015 TB145: a stunning video sequence (30/31 Oct. 2015)

    Potentially Hazardous Asteroid 2015 TB145: an image (30 Oct. 2015)

    Potentially Hazardous Asteroid 2015 TB145: an image (30 Oct. 2015)

    At Virtual Telescope, we did a great work tracking the “Halloween”, potentially hazardous asteroid 2015 TB145 while approaching us late last Oct. We obtained an early image and planned a live, online event, which turned out to be a huge international success. More than 15.000 individuals from many different Countries joined the live feed enjoying this interesting asteroid, which could be a dead comet, assuming its orbit and radar data.

    The image above comes from the event night and it was already presented to our visitors. Now, we are very proud to share with you an exceptional movie, coming from all the images we grabbed during our life feed.

    A total of 276 frames taken back to back and covering 2h and 45 minutes. To our knowledge, no one did something similar with this target. Considering that 165 minutes of coverage are compressed in almost 14 seconds, the motion of the asteroid in the video is accelerated by a factor of 700x. Click on the movie below top get a full resolution version (42 Mb)!.

    Potentially Hazardous Asteroid 2015TB145, a video: click on it for HiRes version

    Images were remotely taken with the PlaneWave 17″+Paramount ME+SBIG STL-6303E robotic unit part of the Virtual Telescope. The telescope tracked the apparent motion of the asteroid, which is visible as a sharp dot of light in the center, while stars are trailing on the background. Looking at the video, it is evident how, while it moves in the sky, the Moon glare interfered more and more with the vision.

    Below is the podcast from our live feed

    Back to “Star Words page

    Support The Virtual Telescope Project!

    If everyone reading this right now would donate something, our fundraiser would be done in a few days. Please, donate and receive an exclusive, LIMITED EDITION image of potentially hazardous asteroids taken by the Virtual Telescope! specifically made for supporters like you!

    donate now (you can adjust the amount later)

     

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